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dc.contributor.convenorClem Davisen_US
dc.contributor.authorKing, B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrushett, B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLemckert, Charlesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:29:48Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:29:48Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2013-06-21T02:51:02Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1088/1755-1315/11/1/011001en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/31479
dc.description.abstractMetocean forecast datasets are essential for the timely response to search and rescue (SAR) incidents and pollutant spill mitigation at sea. To effectively model the possible drift pattern of a person lost at sea, or to approximate the area of impact for a marine spill, both wind and ocean current forecast datasets are required. There are two ocean current forecast datasets currently used in the Australia and Asia Pacific region: these are the American Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) and the Australian BLUElink model. These forecast models were developed for large scale ocean circulation. Neither of the models incorporate the effects of tidal currents. An aggregation tool, which enables the addition of tidal currents to the ocean currents to both of these models has been produced, thus increasing their effectiveness in coastal regions. There are several wind forecast datasets available including the US Global Forecast System (GFS) and the US Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System (NOGAPS). The availability of several different forecast datasets provides a unique opportunity to compare the outcome of a particular modelling exercise with the outcome of another using a different dataset. If the two exercises provide similar results, there is a consensus between the datasets and the modeller can be confident that the outcome is as accurate as possible. If there is a difference between the two results, then there is no consensus, which suggests that the outcome may not be as reliable. Two recent modelling exercises, the oil spill resulting from the damaged Pacific Adventurer (in Queensland) and the oil spill from the West Atlas well blowout (in Western Australia) are presented as case studies to examine consensus modelling and the use of the EDS within OILMAP.en_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNo data provideden_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationYen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameAtmosphere, Oceans, Environment and Societyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleAustralian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society. 17th National Conference.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2010-01-27en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2010-01-29en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationCamberraen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPhysical Oceanographyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode040503en_US
dc.titleReview of Metocean Forecast Datasets and a Case Study of Consensus Modellingen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE3 - Conference Publications (Extract Paper)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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