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dc.contributor.authorde Paleville, Daniela Tersonen_US
dc.contributor.authorSwank, Ann Marieen_US
dc.contributor.authorFunk, Danielen_US
dc.contributor.authorBradley, Sherrien_US
dc.contributor.authorTopp, Roberten_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:32:37Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:32:37Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2010-07-19T04:42:13Z
dc.identifier.issn09732152en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/31622
dc.description.abstractOne of the most pronounced changes associated with aging is the impairment of movement, related in part to decreased strength. This study evaluated the effect of using hand-held and ankle weights on isometric strength and functional ability with a group of healthy older adults participating in an 8-week Body Recall exercise programme. Body Recall consists of 60 minutes of group instruction using rhythmic movements in a manner feasible for older adults of all fitness levels. Thirty-two healthy subjects were randomly assigned to two experimental groups; Body Recall (BR) or Body Recall with weights (BR+W). Isometric strength was measured with a hand-held dynamometer for shoulder flexion, knee extension, hip flexion, ankle plantar flexion and grip strength. Subjects in the BR+W group underwent a functional ability test designed to simulate grocery shopping. This test consisted of standing from a sitting position, walking 15.2 m and returning 15.2 m carrying a self-selected weight simulating a bag of groceries. A decreased time or increased weight carried while performing this task was an indication of greater functional ability. A significant increase in isometric strength for BR+W in comparison to BR was found for ankle plantar flexion (53.2 +/- 16.9 to 69.6 +/- 12.2 Kg, p< 0.01) as well as hip flexion (34.2 ᱳ.9 to 46.0 ᠷ.3 Kg, p< 0.05). There was no significant change (p > 0.05) in the time to complete the functional ability test, however, subjects significantly increased (p < 0.05) the weight carried during this assessment. Adding weights to low intensity body movements increased lower extremity isometric strength as well as the capacity to carry weight during a functional task.en_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherFitness Society of Indiaen_US
dc.publisher.placeIndiaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.fsionline.org/v3p12007/2009_1_7.htmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom51en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto59en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Fitnessen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume5en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode321401en_US
dc.titleAdding weights to low intensity exercise increases isometric muscular strength and functional ability in healthy older adultsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC3 - Letter or Noteen_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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