Show simple item record

dc.contributor.convenorLord Patelen_AU
dc.contributor.authorMeedeniya, Adrianen_US
dc.contributor.authorDwyer, Patricken_US
dc.contributor.authorChehrehasa, Fatemehen_US
dc.contributor.authorMackay-Sim, Alanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:06:15Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:06:15Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2010-07-09T03:09:18Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/31737
dc.description.abstractBackground: There is continuing neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the adult brain which supplies interneurons to the olfactory bulb. There is also continuing neurogenesis in the olfactory epithelium (OE) supplying new olfactory sensory neurons whose axons terminate in the olfactory bulb. These axons synapse with tyrosine hydroxylase-positive periglomerular neurons, which are the product of subventricular zone neurogenesis. Hypothesis: SVZ neurogenesis is regulated coordinately with olfactory epithelial neurogenesis. Aims: The aim is to quantify the rate of cell proliferation in the SVZ after killing the olfactory sensory neurons, which upregulates neurogenesis in the OE. Methods: Adult mice were treated with methimazole, and the tissues were examined at different times after treatment. The survival of the olfactory sensory neurons within the OE was assessed together with their terminals within glomeruli of the olfactory bulb. The loss of tyrosine hydroxylase periglomerular neurons was quantified. Cell proliferation in the SVZ was also quantified using an antibody to Ki67, a marker of proliferating cells. Results: Methimazole treatment led to loss of olfactory sensory neurons in the OE, loss of their terminals in the glomeruli and loss of tyrosine-hydroxylase-positive periglomerular neurons in the olfactory bulb 14-18 days later. Cell proliferation in the SVZ was increased after methimazole treatment. Conclusion: The results are consistent with our hypothesis that neurogenesis in the brain may be regulated with neurogenesis in the nose. We propose the presence of a signalling pathway between these two neurogenic zones, which remains to be elucidated.en_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherNo data provideden_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameSecond UKNSCN Annual Scientific Conferenceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleProceedings, UK National Stem Cell Networksen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2009-04-06en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2009-04-08en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationOxford, United Kingdomen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNeurosciences not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110999en_US
dc.titleIs neurogenesis in the brain regulated by neurogenesis in the nose?en_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE3 - Conference Publications (Extract Paper)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorMackay-Sim, Alan
gro.griffith.authorMeedeniya, Adrian C.
gro.griffith.authorDwyer, Patrick K.
gro.griffith.authorChehrehasa, Fatemeh


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Conference outputs
    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

Show simple item record