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dc.contributor.convenorAvi Hyman, University of Toronto, Canadaen_AU
dc.contributor.authorAl-Saghier, Hishamen_US
dc.contributor.authorAlshangeeti, Ayshaen_US
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, Anneen_US
dc.contributor.editorFlorin Salajanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-04T15:06:17Z
dc.date.available2017-04-04T15:06:17Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2010-08-31T07:49:03Z
dc.identifier.refurihttp://www.academic-conferences.org/icel/icel2009/icel09-home.htmen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/31922
dc.description.abstractThe application of Information and Communication Technologies (ITCs) in education can result in an enhancement of the delivery of educational services provided by universities. However, the success of such online education initiatives depends critically on a core resource, namely the cooperation and full participation of faculty members who deliver quality instruction. In 2000, King Saud University (KSU) in Saudi Arabia launched its online education initiative. This study uses the theory of innovation diffusion and standard survey designs to investigate KSU faculty members' perceptions about key attributes of online teaching, and their overall attitude toward this innovative form of teaching. The study also analyzes the relationship between, on one hand, a faculty member's background and personal characteristics and, on the other, their perceptions regarding the above attributes of online teaching. Finally, the study examines the link between such faculty perceptions and their overall attitude toward online teaching. A sample of 20 KSU faculty members participated in our quantitative survey. Analyses of variance (ANOVA) conducted with the collected data suggest that a given faculty member's professional area (or discipline), gender, and prior experience with online teaching have some influence over his or her ratings of this form of teaching, in terms of several key attributes. Correlation coefficients indicate significant and positive association between such faculty ratings and their attitude toward adopting online education. The paper explores some implications of the main findings.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherAcademic Publishing Ltden_US
dc.publisher.placeReading, UKen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.academic-conferences.org/icel/icel2009/icel09-home.htmen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencename4th International Conference on e-Learningen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitle4th International Conference on e-Learningen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2009-07-16en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2009-07-17en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationUniversity of Toronto, Canadaen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCommunications Technologies not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode100599en_US
dc.titleFaculty Perceptions of Attributes Affecting the Diffusion of Online Learning in Saudi Arabia: A Quantitative Studyen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, School of Information and Communication Technologyen_US
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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