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dc.contributor.authorManning, Matthewen_US
dc.contributor.authorHomel, Rossen_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Christineen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T09:08:20Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T09:08:20Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2010-07-14T07:46:37Z
dc.identifier.issn0190-7409en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.childyouth.2009.11.003en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/32011
dc.description.abstractWe present the results of a meta-analytic review of early developmental prevention programs (children aged 0-5: structured preschool programs, center-based developmental day care, home visitation, family support services and parental education) delivered to at-risk populations on non-health outcomes during adolescence (educational success, cognitive development, social-emotional development, deviance, social participation, involvement in criminal justice, and family well-being). This review improves on previous meta-analyses because it includes a more comprehensive set of adolescent outcomes, it focuses on measures that are psychometrically valid, and it includes a more detailed analysis of program moderator effects. Seventeen studies, based on eleven interventions (all US-based) met the ten criteria for inclusion into the analysis. The mean effect size across all programs and outcomes was 0.313, equivalent to a 62% higher mean score for an intervention group than for a control group. The largest effect was for educational success during adolescence (effect size 0.53) followed by social deviance (0.48), social participation (0.37), cognitive development (0.34), involvement in criminal justice (0.24), family well-being (0.18), and social-emotional development (0.16). Programs that lasted longer than three years were associated with larger sample means than programs that were longer than one year but shorter than three years. More intense programs (those with more than 500 sessions per participant) also had larger means than less intense programs. There was a marginally significant trend for programs with a follow-through component into the early primary school years (e.g. preschool to Grade 3) to have more positive effects than programs without a follow-through. We conclude that the impact of well-conducted early development programs on quality of life in adolescence can be substantial for social policy purposes.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent602527 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom506en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto519en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalChildren and Youth Services Reviewen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume32en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCauses and Prevention of Crimeen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160201en_US
dc.titleA meta-analysis of the effects of early developmental prevention programs in at-risk populations on non-health outcomes in adolescenceen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Criminology and Criminal Justiceen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2010 Elsevier. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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