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dc.contributor.authorSarmah, A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNorthcott, G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLeusch, F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTremblay, L.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T11:08:48Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T11:08:48Z
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.date.modified2010-07-21T04:56:02Z
dc.identifier.issn00489697en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.scitotenv.2005.02.027en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/32488
dc.description.abstractWe report the results of a recent survey of the concentration of natural estrogens (17߭estradiol, 17a-estradiol, estrone, estriol) and the synthetic estrogen, 17a-ethynylestradiol in representative animal wastes and sewage treatment plant (STP) effluents in the Waikato region of New Zealand. Dairy farm effluent samples showed high levels of estradiol (19-1360 ng/L) and its breakdown product estrone (41-3123 ng/L) compared with piggery or goat farm effluents. The combined load for these estrogens (excluding ߠepimer) varied from 60 to > 4000 ng/L. The piggery effluent provided the lowest total estrogen load (46 ng/L), with estrone accounting for nearly 60% of the measured estrogens in this sample. The synthetic analogue, 17a-ethynylestradiol was detected only in one wastewater treatment plant sample, albeit at trace level. An estrogen receptor competitive binding assay was used to test the biological activity of the samples and confirmed that most agricultural waste samples contain high levels of estrogenic compounds. The potential of these wastes to cause endocrine disruption in the receiving ecosystem is unknown at presenten_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherElsevier BVen_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom135en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto144en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1-3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalScience of the Total Environmenten_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume355en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental and Occupational Health and Safetyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Impact Assessmenten_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111705en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050204en_US
dc.titleA survey of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in municipal sewage and animal waste effluents in the Waikato region of New Zealanden_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.date.issued2006
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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