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dc.contributor.authorZhang, Wenbaoen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Zhuangzhien_US
dc.contributor.authorYimit, Turhongen_US
dc.contributor.authorShi, Baoxinen_US
dc.contributor.authorAili, Hasyetien_US
dc.contributor.authorTulson, Gulnoren_US
dc.contributor.authorYou, Hongen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Junen_US
dc.contributor.authorGray, Darrenen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcManus, Donen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Jinchengen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T11:15:27Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T11:15:27Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2010-10-19T06:59:25Z
dc.identifier.issn19352735en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pntd.0000534en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/33017
dc.description.abstractBackground: Cystic hydatid disease (CHD) is a global parasitic zoonosis caused by the dog tapeworm, Echinococcus granulosus. The disease is hyperendemic in western China because of poor economic development; limited community knowledge of CHD; widespread, small-scale household animal production; home killing of livestock; and the feeding of dogs with uncooked offal. Methodology/Principal Findings: A control program focusing on monthly praziquantel (PZQ) treatment of all registered dogs and culling unwanted and stray dogs has been designed to control CHD in hyperendemic areas in China. A pilot field control project in two counties (Hutubi and Wensu) in Xinjiang, China showed that after 4 years of treatment, the prevalence of dogs with E. granulosus was reduced from 14.7% and 18.6%, respectively, to 0%, and this caused a 90%-100% decrease of CHD in sheep born after commencement of the control program. Conclusions/Significance: The strategy aimed at preventing eggs being released from dogs into the environment by treating animals before adult tapeworms are patent can decrease E. granulosus transmission and considerably reduce hyperendemic CHD. Monthly treatment of dogs with PZQ and culling unwanted and stray dogs have been shown to be an efficient, highly cost-effective and practicable measure for implementation in rural communities. As a result, the Chinese Ministry of Health has launched an extensive CHD control program in 117 counties in western China using this control strategy.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent209723 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrome534-1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagetoe534-7en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue10en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPLoS Neglected Tropical Diseasesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume3en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEpidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111706en_US
dc.titleA Pilot Study for Control of Hyperendemic Cystic Hydatid Disease in Chinaen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2009 McManus et al. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CCAL. (http://www.plos.org/journals/license.html)en_AU
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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