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dc.contributor.authorElias, Juanitaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBeasley, Christineen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T13:23:17Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T13:23:17Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2010-12-01T06:57:37Z
dc.identifier.issn1474-7731en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/14747730902854232en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/33048
dc.description.abstractIn recent years masculinity studies writers, in particular R. W. Connell, have focused on the relationship between globalization and 'hegemonic' forms of masculinity. This paper provides an assessment of this scholarship and argues that whilst Connell and others have usefully identified the gendered nature of globalization, masculinity scholars have also provided a somewhat limiting account of the global hegemonic role of a monolithic top-down 'transnational business masculinity'. By contrast, we suggest a demassification of this notion of hegemonic masculinity. Such a demassification enables the opening up of a dialogue between masculinity studies and feminist and other critical globalization scholars, allowing for a more nuanced analysis that can attend to both the unevenness of globalization in different settings and more detailed awareness of interactions between global and local/cultural/state imperatives. Our aim here is to move away from conceptualizations of globalization and hegemonic masculinity that are exceptionally top-down towards an analysis of the contested and shifting nature of gender identity at the global as well as the local level, to highlight the ways in which different hegemonic masculinities are negotiated, and even resisted. We argue that by understanding 'transnational business masculinity' as a discursive ideal that legitimates the workings of global capitalism, there is scope for a greater level of engagement between critical globalization scholarship and gender studies. This might also open the door to an account of globalization that entails more detailed reference to women and femininities.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent109457 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom281en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto296en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalGlobalizationsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume6en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchInternational Relationsen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160607en_US
dc.titleHegemonic Masculinity and Globalization: Transnational Business Masculinities and Beyonden_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2009 Routledge. This is an electronic version of an article published in Globalizations Volume 6, Issue 2, 2009, 281-296. Globalizations is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com with the open URL of your article.en_AU
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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