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dc.contributor.authorHall, Ianen_US
dc.contributor.authorRengger, Nicholasen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T11:58:37Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T11:58:37Z
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.date.modified2010-08-06T07:23:14Z
dc.identifier.issn00205850en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1468-2346.2005.00439.xen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/33057
dc.description.abstractPolitical theory and International Relations have become increasingly interpenetrated over the last few years. This article traces the evolution of this relationship and the emergence of a literature now termed international political theory. It also suggests that a convergence of contemporary political and economic factors, together with a particular intellectual fashion, run the risk of promoting an unnecessarily and inappropriately narrow international political theory, and closes by suggesting how this might be avoided.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherOUPen_US
dc.publisher.placeUKen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom69en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto82en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Affairsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume81en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchInternational Relationsen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160607en_US
dc.titleThe Right that failed ? The ambiguities of conservative thought and the dilemmas of conservative practice in international affairsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.date.issued2005
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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