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dc.contributor.authorAitken, Leanneen_US
dc.contributor.authorBurmeister, Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorLang, Jacelleen_US
dc.contributor.authorChaboyer, Wendyen_US
dc.contributor.authorS. Richmond, Thereseen_US
dc.contributor.editorThomas T. Yoshikawaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:22:39Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:22:39Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2011-02-01T06:37:34Z
dc.identifier.issn15325415en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1532-5415.2010.02728.xen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/33212
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To describe the seriously injured adult population aged 65 and older; compare the differences in injury characteristics and outcomes in three subgroups aged 65 to 74, 75 to 84, and 85 and older; and identify predictors of death, complications, and hospital discharge destination. DESIGN: Retrospective secondary analysis of data from the Queensland Trauma Registry (QTR) using all patients aged 65 and older admitted from 2003 through 2006. SETTING: Data from 15 regional and tertiary hospitals throughout Queensland, Australia. PARTICIPANTS: Six thousand sixty-nine patients: 2,291 (37.7%) aged 65 to 74, 2,265 (37.3%) aged 75 to 84, and 1,513 (24.9%) aged 85 and older. MEASUREMENTS: Outcome variables includedmortality, complications, and discharge destination (usual residence, rehabilitation, nursing home, convalescence). Predictive factors incorporated demographic details, injury characteristics, and acute care factors. RESULTS: Hospital survival was 95.0%, with a median length of hospital stay of 8 days (interquartile range 5-15), and 33.8% of cases with a major injury developed a complication. Predictors of death included older age, male sex, admission to the intensive care unit (ICU), greater Injury Severity Score (ISS), injury caused by a fall, and two or more injuries; those who had surgery were less likely to die. Predictors of complications included ICU admission, older age, longer hospital stay, and two or more injuries. Predictors of discharge to a nursing home included older age, greater ISS, longer hospital stay, and injury caused by a fall, among others. CONCLUSION: Older adults with severe injuries are at risk of poor outcomes. These findings suggest opportunities for improving geriatric trauma care that could lead to better outcomes.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent167312 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom442en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto449en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Societyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume58en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Nursing: Secondary (Acute Care)en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111003en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110399en_US
dc.titleCharacteristics and outcomes of injured older adults after hospital admissionen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Nursing and Midwiferyen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2010 the American Geriatrics Society. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. The definitive version is available at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/en_AU
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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