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dc.contributor.authorTimms, Carolynen_US
dc.contributor.authorGraham, Deborahen_US
dc.contributor.authorCottrell, Daviden_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T13:27:19Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T13:27:19Z
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.date.modified2010-08-13T07:24:31Z
dc.identifier.issn09578234en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/09578230710778204en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/33438
dc.description.abstractPurpose - The present study seeks to elucidate observed mismatches with workload in teacher respondents to a survey exploring aspects of the work environment. Design/methodology/approach - This phase of the study constituted a pen and paper survey of 298 currently serving teachers in independent schools in Queensland, Australia. Measures used in the research included the Areas of Worklife Survey (AWLS), which identifies matches or mismatches between the worker and organization on six areas of worklife, the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory (OLBI), and the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES). Findings - One sample t-tests revealed respondents reported significantly higher matches in the control, community, fairness and values areas of work life than previously surveyed populations, whereas they reported no difference in reward, and significantly more mismatch with workload. Respondents reported significantly higher levels than previously established norms on the OLBI dimension of exhaustion, but similar levels of disengagement. Responses to the UWES revealed significantly higher dedication and absorption and lower vigor than previously established norms. In addition, respondents reported working long hours in order to fulfill all obligations. Expansion of the quantitative data with respondent comments indicated that teachers working independent schools in Queensland have reached a level of workload that is unsustainable and which constitutes a serious risk to their mental and physical health. Originality/value - This article pinpoints the many reasons why demands made on teachers have extended to a level which is making their work unsustainable and will be of interest to those involved in the teaching profession.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing Ltd.en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom569en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto586en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue5en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Educational Administrationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume45en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSpecialist Studies in Education not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode130399en_US
dc.title“I just want to teach” Queensland independent school teachers and their workloaden_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.date.issued2007
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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