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dc.contributor.authorSampford, Charlesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:18:44Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:18:44Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2011-03-09T07:32:04Z
dc.identifier.issn01576321en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/33585
dc.description.abstractResource-intensive, high-carbon, Western lifestyles are frequently criticised as unsustainable and deeply unsatisfying. However, these lifestyles are still attractive to the majority of Westerners and to a high proportion of the developing world's middle classes. This paper argues that the imminent threat of catastrophic climate change constitutes an immediate political, economic and ethical challenge for citizens of the developed world that cannot be tackled by appeals to asceticism or restraint. There can be no solution to climate change until sustainable conceptions of the good life are developed that those in the West want to live and which others might want to live. While the ultimate solution to climate change is the development of low carbon lifestyles, it is important that government initiatives, governance arrangements and economic incentives support rather than undermine that search. Like the global financial crisis, the climate change crisis also demonstrates what happens when weaknesses in national, corporate and professional governance are exacerbated by weaknesses in global governance. In tackling the latter, it is critical the mistakes now evidenced in the former are avoided - including a rethinking of carbon market and carbon tax alternatives. It is also critical that individuals must take responsibility for their actions as consumers, voters and investors.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent175697 bytes
dc.format.extent36505 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherAustralian Council of Social Service (ACOSS)en_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=077216014508001;res=IELHEAen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom13en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto24en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Journal of Social Issuesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume45en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Policyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160510en_US
dc.titleRe-Conceiving the Good Life - the Key to Sustainable Globalisationen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2010 ACOSS. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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