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dc.contributor.authorBaker, Gideonen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T12:40:02Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T12:40:02Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2013-05-29T02:37:52Z
dc.identifier.issn0305-8298en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0305829810368191en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/33686
dc.description.abstractBy way of a retelling of the story of Montezuma's tragic end at the hands of his inhospitable guest, Cort鳬 this article recovers the spectral presence of wronged hosts in the history of international hospitality. While conditional hospitality, as Jacques Derrida shows, is stalked by the absent or wronged guest, unconditional hospitality is disturbed by the abused host. Derridean deconstruction allows for this counter-haunting; but the host-harming history of hospitality has nonetheless been neglected for two reasons, which a genealogy of hospitality illuminates. Firstly, because it is the hospitality narrative of the little people who, though risking more in offering hospitality, have been marginal in writing its history. Secondly, because the little people's narrative was overwritten by the Homeric account of hospitality - the unlimited welcome of heroes by their fellow elites. Offering more but risking less, this aristocratic hospitality narrative no longer portrayed hosting as precarious. What deconstruction and genealogy together show is that hospitality could never be anything other than precarious, lacking both conceptual stability and historical unity. Thus the ethics of hospitality is always already a politics of hospitality.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent164869 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherSage Publicationsen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom23en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto42en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalMillennium: Journal of International Studiesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume39en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchInternational Relationsen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160607en_US
dc.titleThe Spectre of Montezuma: Hospitality and Hauntingen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2010 SAGE Publications. This is the author-manuscript version of the paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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