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dc.contributor.authorCatterall, Carla P
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-29T12:31:59Z
dc.date.available2017-05-29T12:31:59Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn0006-3606
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/btp.12384
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/337571
dc.description.abstractThis paper presents a new synthesis of the role of native and non-native species in diverse pathways and processes that influence forest regeneration on anthropogenic grassland in the moist tropics. Because of altered species composition, abiotic conditions and landscape habitat mosaics, together with human interventions, these successional pathways differ from those seen in pre-clearing forests. However, representation of different functional life forms of plant (tree, vine, grass, herb and fern) and animal (frugivorous seed disperser, granivorous seed predator, seedling herbivore and carnivore) shows consistent global variation among areas of pasture, intact forest, and post-grassland regrowth. Biotic webs of interaction involve complex indirect influences and feedbacks, which can account for wide observed variation in regeneration trajectories over time. Important processes include: limitation of tree establishment by dense grasses; recruitment and growth of pioneer pasture trees (shading grasses and facilitating bird-assisted seed dispersal); and smothering of trees by vines. In these interactions, species’ functional roles are more important than their biogeographic origins. Case studies in eastern Australia show native rain forest plant species diversity in all life forms increasing over time when pioneer trees are non-native (e.g., Cinnamomum camphora, Solanum mauritianum), concurrent with decreased grass and fern cover and increased abundance of trees and vine tangles. The global literature shows both native and non-native species facilitating and inhibiting regeneration. However conservation goals are often targeted at removing non-native species. Achieving large-scale tropical forest restoration will require increased recognition of their multiple roles, and compromises about allocating resources to their removal.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom809
dc.relation.ispartofpageto824
dc.relation.ispartofissue6
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBiotropica
dc.relation.ispartofvolume48
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiological Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiological Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAgricultural and Veterinary Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode069999
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode06
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode05
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode07
dc.titleRoles of non-native species in large-scale regeneration of moist tropical forests on anthropogenic grassland
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environment
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorCatterall, Carla P.


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