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dc.contributor.authorSampford, Charlesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T08:11:24Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T08:11:24Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2010-09-08T04:57:43Z
dc.identifier.issn10383441en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/33845
dc.description.abstractIn pre-Fitzgerald Queensland, the existence of corruption was widely known but its extent and modes of operation were not fully evident. The Fitzgerald Report identified the need for reform of the structure, procedures and efficiency in public administration in Queensland. What was most striking in the Queensland reform process was that a new model for combatting corruption had been developed. Rather than rely upon a single law and a single institution, existing institutions were strengthened and new institutions were introduced to create a set of mutually supporting and mutually checking institutions, agencies and laws that jointly sought to improve governmental standards and combat corruption. Some of the reforms were either unique to Queensland or very rare. One of the strengths of this approach was that it avoided creating a single over-arching institution to fight corruption. There are many powerful opponents of reform. Influential institutions and individuals resist any interference with their privileges. In order to cause a mass exodus from an entrenched corruption system, a seminal event or defining process is needed to alter expectations and incentives that are sufficient to encourage significant numbers of individuals to desert the corruption system and assist the integrity system in exposing and destroying it. The Fitzgerald Inquiry was such an event. This article also briefly addresses methods for destroying national corruption systems where they emerge and exist.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent272261 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherGrifftith University Law Schoolen_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.griffith.edu.au/law/griffith-law-reviewen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom559en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto576en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalGriffith Law Reviewen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume18en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Policyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160510en_US
dc.titleFrom Deep North to International Governance Exemplar: Fitzgerald's Impact on the International Anti-Corruption Movementen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2009 Griffith Law School. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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