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dc.contributor.authorBreakey, Hugh
dc.contributor.authorSampford, Charles
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-28T01:30:21Z
dc.date.available2018-06-28T01:30:21Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn0313-0096
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/338527
dc.description.abstractTraditionally, most professionals operated as sole practitioners or in small partnerships. This work environment affected professions' images of themselves and the way their ethics was conceived and written. But the locus of practice has changed and is continuing to change. Though the common image of professionals remains of sole practitioners serving individual clients on a one-toone basis, many of the most senior professionals work within large organisations. These organisational environments may be characterised by intense competition for work and/or clients both within and between organisations. Instead of a professional enjoying security of occupation and income, and wide professional autonomy, he or she may be placed in contexts that are large, competitive, teambased, and/or multidisciplinary, where work is unbundled and spread around, creating situations of low decision latitude and unclear lines of responsibility. The employing organisation may even usurp traditional professional organisation tasks, including socialisation, education, training, self-regulation, lobbying and fostering a sense of identity. In this environment, professionals can seem to face 'multiple duties [which] need to be deciphered and weighed against each other' and may have to 'reconcile the ascendance of commercial considerations over older notions of professionalism'.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherUniversity of New South Wales Law Journal
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.unswlawjournal.unsw.edu.au/news/
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom262
dc.relation.ispartofpageto301
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalUNSW Law Journal
dc.relation.ispartofvolume40
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLaw and Society
dc.subject.fieldofresearchProfessional Ethics (incl. police and research ethics)
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLaw
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode180119
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode220107
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1801
dc.titleEmployed Professionals' Ethical Responsibilities in Public Service and Private Enterprise: Dilemma, Priority and Synthesis
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Law
gro.rights.copyright© 2017 University of New South Wales. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Use hypertext link to access the journal's website.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorSampford, Charles J.
gro.griffith.authorBreakey, Hugh E.


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