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dc.contributor.authorDressel, Bjoernen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T13:05:31Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T13:05:31Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2010-09-10T05:18:33Z
dc.identifier.issn07302177en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1747-1346.2010.00243.xen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/33888
dc.description.abstractAt the beginning of the twenty-first century, Thailand once again suffered political instability. This article argues that the reason for this renewed instability is found in contesting notions of political legitimacy. At one end of the spectrum is the traditional conception of a stratified paternalauthoritarian state where power emanates from the king and his networks-a view closely associated with the trinitarian state ideology of "nation, religion, king." At the other is a much younger and weaker, yet still sturdy, opposing tradition of claiming popular sovereignty, constitutionalism, and performance as an alternative basis of legitimacy. Whether and how Thailand is able to resolve the inherent tension over these conflicting notions of legitimacy is thus critical not only for its return to stability but also for the type of political order likely to emerge in the future.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishingen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom445en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto469en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPolitics & Policyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume38en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchGovernment and Politics of Asia and the Pacificen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160606en_US
dc.titleWhen Notions of Legitimacy Conflict: The Case of Thailanden_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, Department of International Business and Asian Studiesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2010 The Policy Studies Organization. Published by Wiley-Blackwell. Self-archiving of manuscripts in institutional repositories is not yet supported by The Policy Studies Organization. Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version or contact the author for more information.en_AU
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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