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dc.contributor.authorWillis, Rachelleen_US
dc.contributor.authorStewart, Rodneyen_US
dc.contributor.authorPanuwatwanich, Kriengsaken_US
dc.contributor.authorJones, Sarahen_US
dc.contributor.authorKyriakides, Andreasen_US
dc.contributor.editorE. Worrellen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:24:50Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:24:50Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2010-09-10T05:19:18Z
dc.identifier.issn09213449en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.resconrec.2010.03.004en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/33899
dc.description.abstractSustainable urban water consumption has become a critical issue in Australian built environments due to the country's dry climate and increasingly variable rainfall. Residential households have the potential to conserve water, especially across discretionary end uses such as showering. The advent of high resolution smart meters and data loggers allows for the disaggregation of water flow recordings into a registry of water end use events (e.g. showers, washing machine, taps, etc.). This study firstly reports on a water consumption end use study sample of 151 households conducted in the Gold Coast, Australia, with a focus on daily per capita shower end use distributions. A sub-sample of 44 households within the greater sample was recruited for the installation of an alarming visual display monitor locked at 40 litres consumption for bathroom showers. All sub-sample shower end use event durations, volumes and flow rates were then analysed and compared utilising independent sample t-tests pre- and post intervention. The installation of the shower monitor instigated a statistically significant mean reduction of 15.40 litres (27%) in shower event volumes. Monetary savings resulting from modelled water and energy conservation resulted in a 1.65 year payback period for the device. Furthermore, conservative modelling indicated that the citywide implementation of the device could yield 3% and 2.4% savings in total water and energy consumption, respectively. Moreover, a range of non-monetary benefits were indentified, including the deferment of water and energy supply infrastructure, reduced resource inflationary pressures, and climate change mitigation, to name a few. Resource consumption awareness devices like the one evaluated in this study assist resource consumers to take ownership of their usage and individually tackle individualistic and/or society driven conservation goals, ultimately helping to reduce the ecological footprint of built environments.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent264047 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1117en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1127en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue12en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalResources, Conservation and Recyclingen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume54en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Managementen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050205en_US
dc.titleAlarming visual display monitors affecting shower end use water and energy conservation in Australian residential householdsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Engineeringen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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