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dc.contributor.authorKisely, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorLin, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, Charles
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Mark
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Leslie-Anne
dc.contributor.authorVasiliadis, Helen-Maria
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:27:21Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:27:21Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.date.modified2010-12-01T06:57:23Z
dc.identifier.issn0004-8674
dc.identifier.doi10.3109/00048670903279838
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/33908
dc.description.abstractObjective: There is increasing interest in the use of administrative data for surveillance and research in Australia. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of such data for the surveillance of mood and anxiety disorder using databases from the following Canadian provinces: British Columbia, Ontario, Quebec and Nova Scotia. Method: A population-based record-linkage analysis was done using data from physician billings and hospital discharge abstracts, and community-based clinics using a case defi - nition of ICD-9 diagnoses of 296.0-296.9, 311.0, and 300.0-300.9. Results: The prevalence of treated mood and/or anxiety disorder was similar in Nova Scotia, British Columbia, and Ontario at approximately 10%. The prevalence for Quebec was slightly lower at 8%. Findings from the provinces showed consistency across age and sex despite variations in data coding. Women tended to show a higher prevalence overall of mood and anxiety disorder than men. There was considerably more variation, however, when treated anxiety (300.0-300.9) and mood disorders (296.0-296.9, 311.0) were considered separately. Prevalence increased steadily to middle age, declining in the 50s and 60s, and then increased after 70 years of age. Conclusions: Administrative data can provide a useful, reliable and economical source of information for the surveillance of treated mood and/or anxiety disorder. Due to the lack of specifi city, however, in the diagnoses and data capture, it may be difficult to conduct surveillance of mood and anxiety disorders as separate entities. These fi ndings may have implications for the surveillance of mood and anxiety disorders in Australia with the development of a national network for the extraction, linkage and analysis of administrative data.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent270986 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherInforma Healthcare
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1118
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1125
dc.relation.ispartofissue12
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
dc.relation.ispartofvolume43
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiomedical and clinical sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchOther psychology not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode32
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode52
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode529999
dc.titleUse of administrative data for the surveillance of mood and anxiety disorders
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.rights.copyright© 2009 Informa Healthcare. This is an electronic version of an article published in Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 43, No. 12 , Pages 1118-1125. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry is available online at: http://informahealthcare.com with the open URL of your article.
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorKisely, Steve R.


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