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dc.contributor.authorBrignell, Amanda
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Katrina
dc.contributor.authorPrior, Margot
dc.contributor.authorDonath, Susan
dc.contributor.authorReilly, Sheena
dc.contributor.authorBavin, Edith L
dc.contributor.authorEadie, Patricia
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Angela T
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-07T04:40:18Z
dc.date.available2017-06-07T04:40:18Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn1362-3613
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1362361316644729
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/339126
dc.description.abstractWe compared loss and gain in communication from 1 to 2 years in children later diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (n = 41), language impairment (n = 110) and in children with typical language development at 7 years (n = 831). Participants were selected from a prospective population cohort study of child language (the Early Language in Victoria Study). Parent-completed communication tools were used. As a group, children with autism spectrum disorder demonstrated slower median skill gain, with an increasing gap between trajectories compared to children with typical development and language impairment. A proportion from all groups lost skills in at least one domain (autism spectrum disorder (41%), language impairment (30%), typical development (26%)), with more children with autism spectrum disorder losing skills in more than one domain (autism spectrum disorder (47%), language impairment (15%, p = 0.0003), typical development (16%, p < 0.001)). Loss was most common for all groups in the domain of ‘emotion and eye gaze’ but with a higher proportion for children with autism spectrum disorder (27%; language impairment (12%, p = 0.03), typical development (14%, p = 0.03)). A higher proportion of children with autism spectrum disorder also lost skills in gesture (p = 0.01), sounds (p = 0.009) and understanding (p = 0.004) compared to children with typical development but not with language impairment. These findings add to our understanding of early communication development and highlight that loss is not unique to autism spectrum disorder.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherSage Publications
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom344
dc.relation.ispartofpageto356
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAutism
dc.relation.ispartofvolume21
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSpecialist Studies in Education
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode119999
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1303
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1702
dc.titleParent-reported patterns of loss and gain in communication in 1- to 2-year-old children are not unique to autism spectrum disorder
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorReilly, Sheena


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