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dc.contributor.authorSchmid, Annina B
dc.contributor.authorKubler, Paul A
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, Venerina
dc.contributor.authorCoppieters, Michel W
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-13T01:09:42Z
dc.date.available2017-06-13T01:09:42Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn0003-6870
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.apergo.2014.08.020
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/339712
dc.description.abstractNon-neutral wrist positions and external pressure leading to increased carpal tunnel pressure during computer use have been associated with a heightened risk of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). This study investigated whether commonly used ergonomic devices reduce carpal tunnel pressure in patients with CTS. Carpal tunnel pressure was measured in twenty-one patients with CTS before, during and after a computer mouse task using a standard mouse, a vertical mouse, a gel mouse pad and a gliding palm support. Carpal tunnel pressure increased while operating a computer mouse. Although the vertical mouse significantly reduced ulnar deviation and the gel mouse pad and gliding palm support decreased wrist extension, none of the ergonomic devices reduced carpal tunnel pressure. The findings of this study do therefore not endorse a strong recommendation for or against any of the ergonomic devices commonly recommended for patients with CTS. Selection of ergonomic devices remains dependent on personal preference.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom151
dc.relation.ispartofpageto156
dc.relation.ispartofjournalApplied Ergonomics
dc.relation.ispartofvolume47
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSports science and exercise
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical physiology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical physiology not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchDesign
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4207
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3208
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode320899
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3303
dc.titleA vertical mouse and ergonomic mouse pads alter wrist position but do not reduce carpal tunnel pressure in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorCoppieters, Michel


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