Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPeel, Alison J
dc.contributor.authorWood, James LN
dc.contributor.authorBaker, Kate S
dc.contributor.authorBreed, Andrew C
dc.contributor.authorde Carvalho, Arlindo
dc.contributor.authorFernandez-Loras, Andres
dc.contributor.authorGabrieli, Harrison Sadiki
dc.contributor.authorGembu, Guy-Crispin
dc.contributor.authorKakengi, Victor A
dc.contributor.authorKaliba, Potiphar M
dc.contributor.authorKityo, Robert M
dc.contributor.authorLembo, Tiziana
dc.contributor.authorMba, Fidel Esono
dc.contributor.authorRamos, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorRodriguez-Prieto, Inaki
dc.contributor.authorSuu-Ire, Richard
dc.contributor.authorCunningham, Andrew A
dc.contributor.authorHayman, David TS
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-02T23:59:48Z
dc.date.available2017-07-02T23:59:48Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn1508-1109
dc.identifier.doi10.3161/15081109ACC2017.19.1.006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/340758
dc.description.abstractThe straw-coloured fruit bat, Eidolon helvum, is a common and conspicuous migratory species, with an extensive distribution across sub-Saharan Africa, yet hunting and habitat loss are thought to be resulting in decline in some areas. Eidolon helvum is also a known reservoir for potentially zoonotic viruses. Despite E. helvum's importance, ecological and behavioural traits are poorly described for this species. Here we present extensive data on the distribution, migration patterns, roost size, age and sex composition of 29 E. helvum roosts from nine countries across tropical Africa, including roosts not previously described in the literature. Roost age and sex composition were dependent on timing of sampling relative to the annual birth pulse. Rather than a single ‘breeding season’ as is frequently reported for this species, regional asynchrony of reproductive timing was observed across study sites (with birth pulses variably starting in March, April, September, November or December). Considered together with its genetic panmixia, we conclude that the species has a fluid, fission-fusion social structure, resulting in different roost ‘types’ at different times of the year relative to seasonal reproduction. Bat-human interactions also varied across the species' geographical range. In the absence of significant hunting, large urban colonies were generally tolerated, yet in regions with high hunting pressure, bats tended to roost in remote or protected sites. The extensive quantitative and qualitative data presented in this manuscript are also valuable for a wide range of studies and provide an historical snapshot as its populations become increasingly threatened.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherMuzeum i Instytut Zoologii
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom77
dc.relation.ispartofpageto92
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalActa Chiropterologica
dc.relation.ispartofvolume19
dc.subject.fieldofresearchZoology not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Science and Management
dc.subject.fieldofresearchZoology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode060899
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0502
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0608
dc.titleHow Does Africa's Most Hunted Bat Vary Across the Continent? Population Traits of the Straw-Coloured Fruit Bat (Eidolon helvum) and Its Interactions with Humans
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environment
gro.rights.copyright© 2017 Science & Medicine. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorPeel, Alison J.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record