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dc.contributor.authorHuang, Yu-Pingen_US
dc.contributor.authorKellett, Ursulaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSt John, Winsomeen_US
dc.contributor.editorAlison Tierneyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T09:21:15Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T09:21:15Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2010-10-26T07:15:06Z
dc.identifier.issn03092402en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2648.2010.05270.xen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/34152
dc.description.abstractAim. This study is a report of a study describing mothers' experience of learning that their child has been diagnosed with cerebral palsy. Background. Learning a child's diagnosis of disability is a crisis for parents. Their reactions include shock, refusal to accept the diagnosis, anger, fear, and uncertainty about the extent of disability and associated impairment. Knowledge about parental reactions is based on studies conducted in western countries, many of which do not apply to Taiwan where Confucianism strongly influences cultural perspectives of family and disability. Method. In this phenomenological study, data were collected in 2005-2006 using in-depth interviews and journaling with 15 Taiwanese mothers of children diagnosed with cerebral palsy. Hermeneutic analysis was undertaken of interview transcripts and journal notes. Findings. Four shared meanings associated with learning of their child's diagnosis were revealed: feeling out of control and powerless, mistrusting healthcare professionals, release and confirmation, and feeling blamed for not following traditional practices. Mothers experienced a loss of their 'ideal' child when their child was diagnosed with cerebral palsy. Expectations of 'normal' motherhood and fulfilling societal anticipation of giving birth to a healthy child were lost. Maintaining their husband's family honour and prosperity, as well as saving face in their community were threatened. Mixed feelings of disbelief, rejection, self-blame and sadness were compounded by uncertainty about their child's future. Conclusion. To promote better understanding of the child's condition, emotional support and information should be provided to the mother and family, both when informing them of the diagnosis and in the period after diagnosis.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent154423 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltden_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationYen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1213en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1221en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue6en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Advanced Nursingen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume66en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Nursing: Tertiary (Rehabilitative)en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111004en_US
dc.titleCerebral palsy: experiences of mothers after learning their child’s diagnosisen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2010 Blackwell Publishing. This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: Cerebral palsey: Experiences of after learning their child's diagnosis, Journal of Advanced Nursing Volume 66, Issue 6, 2010, 1213-1221, which has been published in final form at 10.1111/j.1365-2648.2010.05270.x.en_AU
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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