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dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Rebecca J
dc.contributor.authorCameron, Cate M
dc.contributor.authorMcClure, Rod
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-07T01:42:07Z
dc.date.available2017-07-07T01:42:07Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn1471-2458
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12889-017-4087-0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/341595
dc.description.abstractBackground: Improved understanding of long-term mortality attributable to injury is needed to accurately inform injury burden studies. This study aims to quantify and describe mortality attributable to injury 12 months after an injury-related hospitalisation in Australia. Method: A population-based matched cohort study using linked hospital and mortality data from three Australian states during 2008–2010 was conducted. The injured cohort included individuals ≥18 years who had an injury-related hospital admission in 2009. A comparison cohort of non-injured people was obtain by randomly selecting from the electoral roll. This comparison group was matched 1:1 on age, gender and postcode of residence. Pre-index injury health service use and 12-month mortality were examined. Adjusted mortality rate ratios (MRR) and attributable risk were calculated. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to examine the effect of risk factors on survival. Results: Injured individuals were almost 3 times more likely to die within 12 months following an injury (MRR 2.90; 95% CI: 2.76–3.04). Individuals with a traumatic brain injury (MRR 7.58; 95% CI: 5.92–9.70) or injury to internal organs (MRR 7.38; 95% CI: 5.90–9.22) were 7 times more likely to die than the non-injured group. Injury was likely to be a contributory factor in 92% of mortality within 30 days and 66% of mortality at 12 months following the index injury hospital admission. Adjusted mortality rate ratios varied by type of cause-specific death, with MRR highest for injury-related deaths. Conclusions: There are likely chronic consequences of sustaining a traumatic injury. Longer follow-up post-discharge is needed to consider deaths likely to be attributable to the injury. Better enumeration of long-term injury-related mortality will have the potential to improve estimates of injury burden.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherBioMed Central
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom150-1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto150-9
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBMC Public Health
dc.relation.ispartofvolume17
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHealth services and systems
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic health
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4203
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4206
dc.titleHigher mortality risk among injured individuals in a population-based matched cohort study
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© 2017 The Author(s). This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorCameron, Cate M.


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