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dc.contributor.authorPrenzler, Timothyen_US
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Kirstyen_US
dc.contributor.authorSarre, Ricken_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:46:50Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:46:50Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2010-09-28T06:52:18Z
dc.identifier.issn18710131en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11417-009-9074-7en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/34226
dc.description.abstractThis paper reports on the current status of police and security education in Australian universities and technical colleges. The study was undertaken in the context of calls for greater professionalisation of policing and security along with a variety of conduct scandals that have driven reform agendas for both sectors. The study found that police studies had a significant profile in universities with a wide range of courses available, but virtually no profile in technical and further education (TAFE) colleges. Conversely, protective security offerings were proportionately more prominent in the TAFE sector than in universities. Courses in information and communication technology security were more common across universities and TAFE. The research also found that, of the 39 Australian universities, 9 have research centres related generally to policing and security. These also appeared to favour policing over security. We argue that these findings should be of concern, given the fact that private and public sector security services have eclipsed police, in numbers at least, in many jurisdictions. Security should, we argue, be counted as an equal partner with police in crime prevention services. In addition, we argue that those engaged in security management should be given greater opportunities for study at the university level. Moreover, security studies should have an expanded research focus.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent82754 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto10en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAsian Journal of Criminologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume5en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolice Administration, Procedures and Practiceen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160205en_US
dc.titleTertiary Education in Security and Policing in Australiaen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Criminology and Criminal Justiceen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2010 Springer Netherlands. This is an electronic version of an article published in Asian Journal of Criminology Volume 5, Issue 1, 1-10, 2010. Asian Journal of Criminology is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ with the open URL of your article.en_AU
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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