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dc.contributor.authorBaird, Fiona J
dc.contributor.authorLopata, Andreas L
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-28T00:53:38Z
dc.date.available2017-07-28T00:53:38Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn1664-302X
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fmicb.2014.00365
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/342727
dc.description.abstractTraditional prophylactic vaccination to prevent illness is the primary objective of many research activities worldwide. The golden age of vaccination began with an approach called variolation in ancient China and the evolution of vaccines still continues today with modern developments such as the production of GardasilTM against HPV and cervical cancer. The historical aspect of how different forms of vaccination have changed the face of medicine and communities is important as it dictates our future approaches on both a local and global scale. From the eradication of smallpox to the use of an experimental vaccine to save a species, this review will explore these successes in infectious disease vaccination and also discuss a few significant failures which have hampered our efforts to eradicate certain diseases. The second part of the review will explore designing a prophylactic vaccine for the growing global health concern that is allergy. Allergies are an emerging global health burden. Of particular concern is the rise of food allergies in developed countries where 1 in 10 children is currently affected. The formation of an allergic response results from the recognition of a foreign component by our immune system that is usually encountered on a regular basis. This may be a dust-mite or a prawn but this inappropriate immune response can result in a life-time of food avoidance and lifestyle restrictions. These foreign components are very similar to antigens derived from infectious pathogens. The question arises: should the allergy community be focussing on protective measures rather than ongoing therapeutic interventions to deal with these chronic inflammatory conditions? We will explore the difficulties and benefits of prophylactic vaccination against various allergens by means of genetic technology that will dictate how vaccination against allergens could be utilized in the near future.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherFrontiers Research Foundation
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom365-1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto365-14
dc.relation.ispartofjournalFrontiers in Microbiology
dc.relation.ispartofvolume5
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMicrobiology not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Science and Management
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSoil Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMicrobiology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode060599
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0502
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0503
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0605
dc.titleThe dichotomy of pathogens and allergens in vaccination approaches
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© 2014 Baird and Lopata. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
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gro.griffith.authorBaird, Fiona


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