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dc.contributor.authorWickes, Rebecca
dc.contributor.authorBritt, Chester
dc.contributor.authorBroidy, Lisa
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-13T02:10:19Z
dc.date.available2018-09-13T02:10:19Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn0049-089X
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ssresearch.2016.07.006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/343517
dc.description.abstractSocial disorganization theories position neighborhood social capital and collective efficacy as key social processes that should facilitate community resilience in the aftermath of disaster. Yet limited evidence demonstrates that these social processes are themselves resilient with some studies showing that disaster can fracture even once cohesive neighborhoods. In this paper we assess the stability of neighborhood level collective efficacy and social capital before and after a disaster. We use multilevel structural equation modeling and draw on census and longitudinal survey data collected from over 4000 residents living in 148 neighborhoods in Brisbane, Australia before and after a significant flood event. We examine what happens to social capital and collective efficacy in flooded and non-flooded neighborhoods and assess whether demographic shifts are associated with change and/or stability in these processes. We find strong evidence that these processes operate similarly across flooded and not flooded communities. Our findings also reveal significant stability for our measures of social capital across time, while collective efficacy increases post flood across all neighborhoods, but more so in flooded neighborhoods. Neighborhood demographics have limited effect on patterns of stability or change in these social processes. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications of these findings for our understanding of neighborhood resilience in the wake of disaster.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherAcademic Press
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom96
dc.relation.ispartofpageto119
dc.relation.ispartofjournalSocial Science Research
dc.relation.ispartofvolume62
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminology not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160299
dc.titleThe resilience of neighborhood social processes: A case study of the 2011 Brisbane flood
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2017 Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBroidy, Lisa


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