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dc.contributor.authorHewetson, Ronelle
dc.contributor.authorCornwell, Petrea
dc.contributor.authorShum, David
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-14T05:14:08Z
dc.date.available2017-08-14T05:14:08Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn1074-9357
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10749357.2017.1289622
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/344000
dc.description.abstractBackground: Rehabilitation positively influences return to activities and social roles in people with aphasia. The cognitive-communication disorder (CCD) found following a right hemisphere stroke has been less extensively researched with rehabilitation access and outcomes yet to be determined. Objectives: To document rehabilitation access and outcomes for people with CCD post-stroke; and compare outcomes based on presence (viz CCD; aphasia) or absence of communication impairment. Methods: A retrospective chart audit was completed for patients with first onset unilateral stroke, with a hospital length of stay (LOS) of at least two days and a communication assessment by a speech pathologist. Data extracted included presence and severity of communication impairment, access to and LOS in a rehabilitation unit, and functional outcome measures recorded at rehabilitation discharge. Results: The majority of the 115 patients who met inclusion criteria were living independently (n = 112, 97.4%) at the time of stroke. CCD (66%) was diagnosed with similar frequency to aphasia (68%). The presence of communication impairment did not result in significant differences in rehabilitation LOS and discharge destination when compared to hemispheric strokes without communication impairment. Severity of CCD was an independent predictor of functional gain by rehabilitation discharge. Conclusions: People with CCD require comparable access to rehabilitation as people with aphasia, and severity of CCD should be considered in determining rehabilitation LOS. A large number of people are discharged with ongoing CCD which warrants exploration of potential participation restrictions created by the communication impairment.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom330
dc.relation.ispartofpageto336
dc.relation.ispartofissue5
dc.relation.ispartofjournalTopics in Stroke Rehabilitation
dc.relation.ispartofvolume24
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNeurosciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110399
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1109
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1115
dc.titleCognitive-communication disorder following right hemisphere stroke: exploring rehabilitation access and outcomes
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Applied Psychology
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorShum, David
gro.griffith.authorCornwell, Petrea
gro.griffith.authorHewetson, Ronelle


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