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dc.contributor.authorJackson, Sue
dc.contributor.authorPalmer, Lisa
dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, Fergus
dc.contributor.authorBumpusy, Adam
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-21T01:41:10Z
dc.date.available2017-08-21T01:41:10Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn2469-4452
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/24694452.2016.1270187
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/344142
dc.description.abstractClimate change and the associated need to decarbonize pose not just risks to cultures but potential opportunities for cultural experimentation, renewal, and economic dynamism. An Australian case of carbon mitigation through carbon farming represents a discursive tool with which indigenous groups are seeking to leverage a very distinct conceptualization of payment for ecosystem services, one that values the labor and reciprocal relationships and logic of care required to abate or sequester carbon. Inscribed with an inalienable ancestral cultural signature, the indigenous produced carbon offsets being promoted by indigenous carbon market participants represent more than a mere carbon reduction; they initiate processes of potentially enduring exchange and engagement. This carbon signature works to enrich carbon as well as embed peoples' relations with it, with each other, and with the places from which the offset is generated. Contributing to emergent research into cultures of carbon, it is our conjecture that valorizing these relations in ethical exchanges is a potentially productive way of financing alternative approaches to environmental stewardship. The insights signal potential prospects for other marginalized cultures to appropriate, repurpose, and benefit from mainstream decarbonization strategies and participate in climate governance.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom867
dc.relation.ispartofpageto882
dc.relation.ispartofissue4
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAnnals of the American Association of Geographers
dc.relation.ispartofvolume107
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEcological Impacts of Climate Change
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050101
dc.titleCultures of Carbon and the Logic of Care: The Possibilities for Carbon Enrichment and Its Cultural Signature
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environment
gro.rights.copyright© 2017 Taylor & Francis (Routledge). This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Annals of the American Association of Geographers on 25 Feb 2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/24694452.2016.1270187
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorJackson, Sue E.


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