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dc.contributor.authorGasparini, Claudia
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Robert A.
dc.contributor.authorGriffiths, Lyn R.
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-17T01:36:35Z
dc.date.available2017-08-17T01:36:35Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn1129-2369
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s10194-016-0711-0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/344285
dc.description.abstractMigraine is a brain disorder characterized by a piercing headache which affects one side of the head, located mainly at the temples and in the area around the eye. Migraine imparts substantial suffering to the family in addition to the sufferer, particularly as it affects three times more women than men and is most prevalent between the ages of 25 and 45, the years of child rearing. Migraine typically occurs in individuals with a genetic predisposition and is aggravated by specific environmental triggers. Attempts to study the biochemistry of migraine began as early as the 1960s and were primarily directed at serotonin metabolism after an increase of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), the main metabolite of serotonin was observed in urine of migraineurs. Genetic and biochemical studies have primarily focused on the neurotransmitter serotonin, considering receptor binding, transport and synthesis of serotonin and have investigated serotonergic mediators including enzymes, receptors as well as intermediary metabolites. These studies have been mainly assayed in blood, CSF and urine as the most accessible fluids. More recently PET imaging technology integrated with a metabolomics and a systems biology platform are being applied to study serotonergic biology. The general trend observed is that migraine patients have alterations of neurotransmitter metabolism detected in biological fluids with different biochemistry from controls, however the interpretation of the biological significance of these peripheral changes is unresolved. In this review we present the biology of the serotonergic system and metabolic routes for serotonin and discuss results of biochemical studies with regard to alterations in serotonin in brain, cerebrospinal fluid, saliva, platelets, plasma and urine of migraine patients.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom20-1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto20-24
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Headache and Pain
dc.relation.ispartofvolume18
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical Biochemistry and Metabolomics not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchGenetics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110199
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0604
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.titleGenetic and biochemical changes of the serotonergic system in migraine pathobiology
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.facultyOffice of the Snr Dep Vice Chancellor, Institute for Glycomics
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2017. Open Access. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorGasparini, Claudia F.


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