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dc.contributor.authorByrne, Jasonen_US
dc.contributor.authorSearle, Glenen_US
dc.contributor.authorSipe, Neilen_US
dc.contributor.editorNeil Sipeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-04T21:03:42Z
dc.date.available2017-04-04T21:03:42Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2012-05-01T22:32:00Z
dc.identifier.issn07293682en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/07293682.2010.508204en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/34429
dc.description.abstractAustralian cities exhibit a quality of life arguably among the best in the world, but rapidly expanding populations may soon threaten this status. The burgeoning conurbation of South East Queensland (SEQ) is an example. Recent growth management policies and plans (e.g. South East Queensland Regional Plan and local authority growth management strategies) have sought to curtail urban sprawl through urban footprints, growth management boundaries, urban consolidation, and other measures. The 'density imperative' presented by these collective urban policies affects the sourcing, provision and management of open space in inner-city locales in SEQ which may soon run out of land for parks and urban greenspace. This paper presents results from recent research into the environmental equity dimensions of providing urban greenspace in SEQ. Critiquing the long-entrenched parks-standards approach, the paper offers a 'needs-based' alternative, and considers its utility for SEQ and other fast-growing Australian urban areas. Questioning orthodox planning perspectives about who lives in higher density areas, we argue that local and state governments should look towards a variety of new types of green and open space to meet the needs of existing and future residents living in denser built environments.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent1195095 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherRoutledge Taylor and Francisen_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom162en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto177en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Planneren_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume47en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchUrban and Regional Studies (excl. Planning)en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLand Use and Environmental Planningen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160404en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode120504en_US
dc.titleGreen around the gills? The challenge of density for urban greenspace planning in SEQen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2010 Planning Institute of Australia. This is the author-manuscript version of the article published in Australian Planner Volume 47, Issue 3 September 2010 , pages 162 - 177. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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