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dc.contributor.authorWillis, D.H.R.
dc.contributor.authorTong, D.C.
dc.contributor.authorThomson, W. Murray
dc.contributor.authorLove, Robert M.
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-18T01:07:32Z
dc.date.available2018-05-18T01:07:32Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.issn0028-8047en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/345023
dc.description.abstractObjective: To investigate New Zealand GDPs' awareness of maxillofacial trauma and to identify their associated referral patterns. Design: Cross-sectional survey of a random sample of GDPs. Method: A nationwide postal questionnaire survey was sent to GDPs on the New Zealand Dental Register, maintained by the Dental Council of New Zealand. The questionnaire requested socio-demographic details, together with information on the availability of specialist services and their need for continuing professional development in oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS). The questionnaire also asked the GDPs to indicate which specialty (plastic surgery, ear nose and throat (ENT) surgery, OMS and Other) they expected to manage—and to which specialty they would refer—seven types of maxillofacial injury. Results: Some 377 GDPs responded (76.6%). The majority of GDPs expected OMS to manage maxillofacial trauma, except for facial lacerations and isolated nasal fractures which were expected to be managed by plastic surgery (83.0%) and ENT surgery (79.7%), respectively. Most GDPs (48.0% to 87.9%) referred maxillofacial trauma to OMS, except for isolated nasal fractures, for which there were similar proportions referred to ENT surgery and OMS (45.8% and 41.4%, respectively). Differences in awareness of and referral patterns for maxillofacial trauma were identified by dentist characteristics. Most GDPs (96.0%) felt there was a need for continuing professional development in OMS, and most (84.1%) preferred this to be in the form of lectures and seminars. Conclusion: The first-ever study of GDP referral patterns for maxillofacial trauma in New Zealand has revealed that most GDPs in New Zealand referred maxillofacial trauma appropriately to OMS.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherNew Zealand Dental Associationen_US
dc.publisher.urihttps://www.nzda.org.nz/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom97en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto102en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalNew Zealand Dental Journalen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume106en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchDentistry not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110599en_US
dc.titleMaxillofacial trauma and the GDP - Specialty recognition and patterns of referralen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
dc.description.versionPublisheden_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2010 New Zealand Dental Association. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
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