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dc.contributor.authorBuckley, Ralfen_US
dc.contributor.editorDaniel Dietrichen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T12:43:37Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T12:43:37Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2011-05-09T06:50:26Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/34639
dc.description.abstractWorldwide, adventure tourism is a trillion-dollar subsector of the multi-trillion-dollar commercial tourism industry. It has grown from small beginnings as a result of: increasing urbanization of human populations in the developed world; increased marketing of adventure experiences through various forms of mass entertainment; increased commercialization of outdoor recreation; and increased commercial opportunities for associated equipment, clothing and residential property sales. A wide variety of different outdoor activities are available as commercial adventure tourism products. The majority of adventure tourism products are short-duration, low-skill, low-priced, high-volume trips offered close to mainstream tourism destinations. Clients are either passive, as in tandem skydiving; or take part with limited training provided as part of the product, as in whitewater paddle-rafting. A smaller proportion of adventure tourism products are longer-duration, higher-priced trips in remote areas, available only to active participants with prior skills and specialist equipment. The psychology of participants and guides in adventure tourism and recreation has been examined quite extensively, perhaps more so than the structure of the commercial products. It appears that there are a wide variety of different motivations, some personal and internal, and some social and external. Risk management aspects of adventure tourism, and to a lesser extent environmental management aspects, have also received research attention. Overall, considering the economic scale of the adventure tourism subsector relative to the rest of the tourism industry and other industry sectors, it is as yet remarkably little-studied. There are many research opportunities remaining, whether it is viewed as an industry subsector or a category of human behaviour. As yet there are apparently only three academic books on adventure tourism. The most recent are Adventure Tourism (2006, CABI) and Adventure Tourism Management (2010, Elsevier), both written by Ralf Buckley. The former presents and analyses a large set of case studies; the latter addresses a range of different management aspects. Both contain bibliographies of previous literature.en_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent31382 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.publisher.placeAmsterdamen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.scitopics.com/Adventure_Tourism.htmlen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissueN/Aen_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalSciTopicsen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Sciences not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode059999en_US
dc.titleAdventure Tourismen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC3 - Letter or Noteen_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the author 2010. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this journal please refer to the journal's website or contact the author.en_AU
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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