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dc.contributor.authorGabbett, Timothyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:44:12Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:44:12Z
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.issn03063674en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/3464
dc.description.abstractObjectives-To investigate the physiological and anthropometric characteristics of amateur rugby league players. Methods-Thirty five amateur rugby league players (19 forwards and 16 backs) were measured for height, body mass, percentage body fat (sum of four skinfolds), muscular power (vertical jump), speed (10 m and 40 m sprint), and maximal aerobic power (multistage fitness test). Data were also collected on match frequency, training status, playing experience, and employment related physical activity levels. Results-The 10 m and 40 m sprint, vertical jump, percentage body fat, and multistage fitness test results were 20-42% poorer than previously reported for professional rugby league players. Compared with forwards, backs had significantly (p<0.01) lower body mass (79.7 (74.7-84.7) kg v 90.8 (86.2-95.4) kg) and significantly (p<0.01) greater speed during the 40 m sprint (6.45 (6.35-6.55) v 6.79 (6.69-6.89) seconds). Values for percentage body fat, vertical jump, 10 m sprint, and maximal aerobic power were not significantly different (p>0.05) between forwards and backs. When compared with professional rugby league players, the training status of amateur rugby league players was 30-53% lower, with players devoting less than three hours a week to team training sessions and about 30 minutes a week to individual training sessions. The training time devoted to the development of muscular power (about 13 minutes a week), speed (about eight minutes a week), and aerobic fitness (about 34 minutes a week) did not differ significantly (p>0.05) between forwards and backs. At the time of the field testing, players had participated, on average, in one 60 minute match every eight days. Conclusions-The physiological and anthropometric characteristics of amateur rugby league players are poorly developed. These findings suggest that position specific training does not occur in amateur rugby league. The poor fitness of non-elite players may be due to a low playing intensity, infrequent matches of short duration, and/or an inappropriate training stimulus.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Groupen_US
dc.publisher.placeUK, Australiaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjsm.34.4.303en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom303en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto307en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBritish Journal of Sports Medicineen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume34en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHISTORY AND ARCHAEOLOGYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode210000en_US
dc.titlePhysiological and anthropometric characteristics of amateur rugby league playersen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Medical Scienceen_US
gro.date.issued2015-05-12T02:01:24Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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