Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Shelley
dc.contributor.authorChaboyer, Wendy
dc.contributor.authorGonzalez, Ruben
dc.contributor.authorMarshall, Andrea
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-18T12:31:41Z
dc.date.available2019-01-18T12:31:41Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn1472-6963
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12913-017-2314-0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/346738
dc.description.abstractBackground: Patient participation in health care is associated with improved outcomes for patients and hospitals. New technologies are creating vast potential for patients to participate in care at the bedside. Several studies have explored patient use, satisfaction and perceptions of health information technology (HIT) interventions in hospital. Understanding what works for whom, under what conditions, is important when considering interventions successfully engaging patients in care. This realist review aimed to determine key features of interventions using bedside technology to engage hospital patients in their care and analyse these in terms of context, mechanisms and outcomes. Methods: A realist review was chosen to explain how and why complex HIT interventions work or fail within certain contexts. The review was guided by Pawson’s realist review methodology, involving: clarifying review scope; searching for evidence; data extraction and evidence appraisal; synthesising evidence and drawing conclusions. Author experience and an initial literature scope provided insight and review questions and theories (propositions) around why interventions worked were developed and iteratively refined. A purposive search was conducted to find evidence to support, refute or identify further propositions, which formed an explanatory model. Each study was ‘mined’ for evidence to further develop the propositions and model. Results: Interactive learning was the overarching theme of studies using technology to engage patients in their care. Several propositions underpinned this, which were labelled: information sharing; self-assessment and feedback; tailored education; user-centred design; and support in use of HIT. As studies were mostly feasibility or usability studies, they reported patient-centred outcomes including patient acceptability, satisfaction and actual use of HIT interventions. For each proposition, outcomes were proposed to come about by mechanisms including improved communication, shared decision-making, empowerment and self-efficacy; which acted as facilitators to patient participation in care. Overall, there was a stronger representation of health than IT disciplines in studies reviewed, with a lack of IT input in terms of theoretical underpinning, methodological design and reporting of outcomes. Conclusion: HIT interventions have great potential for engaging hospitalised patients in their care. However, stronger interdisciplinary collaboration between health and IT researchers is needed for effective design and evaluation of HIT interventions
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherBioMed Central
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom388-1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto388-15
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBMC Health Services Research
dc.relation.ispartofvolume17
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLibrary and Information Studies
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111799
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0807
dc.titleUsing technology to engage hospitalised patients in their care: a realist review
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.description.versionPublished
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Public Health
gro.description.notepublicPage numbers are not for citation purposes. Instead, this article has the unique article number of 388.
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2017. Open Access. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorChaboyer, Wendy
gro.griffith.authorGonzalez, Ruben
gro.griffith.authorRoberts, Shelley J.
gro.griffith.authorMarshall, Andrea


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record