Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCameron, Cate M
dc.contributor.authorOsborne, Jodie M
dc.contributor.authorSpinks, Anneliese B
dc.contributor.authorDavey, Tamzyn M
dc.contributor.authorSipe, Neil
dc.contributor.authorMcClure, Roderick J
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-22T01:30:37Z
dc.date.available2017-09-22T01:30:37Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn2044-6055
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmjopen-2016-015584
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/347041
dc.description.abstractBackground: Longitudinal research is subject to participant attrition. Systemic differences between retained participants and those lost to attrition potentially bias prevalence of outcomes, as well as exposure-outcome associations. This study examines the impact of attrition on the prevalence of child injury outcomes and the association between sociodemographic factors and child injury. Methods: Participants were recruited as part of the Environments for Healthy Living (EFHL) birth cohort study. Baseline data were drawn from maternal surveys. Child injury outcome data were extracted from hospital records, 2006–2013. Participant attrition status was assessed up to 2014. Rates of injury-related episodes of care were calculated, taking into account exposure time and Poisson regression was performed to estimate exposure-outcome associations. Results: Of the 2222 participating families, 799 families (36.0%) had complete follow-up data. Those with incomplete data included 137 (6.2%) who withdrew, 308 (13.8%) were lost to follow-up and 978 families (44.0%) who were partial/non-responders. Families of lower socioeconomic status were less likely to have complete follow-up data (p<0.05). Systematic differences in attrition did not result in differential child injury outcomes or significant differences between the attrition and non-attrition groups in risk factor effect estimates. Participants who withdrew were the only group to demonstrate differences in child injury outcomes. Conclusion: This research suggests that even with considerable attrition, if the proportion of participants who withdraw is minimal, overall attrition is unlikely to affect the population prevalence estimate of child injury or measures of association between sociodemographic factors and child injury.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Group
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrome015584-1
dc.relation.ispartofpagetoe015584-10
dc.relation.ispartofissue6
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBMJ Open
dc.relation.ispartofvolume7
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchOther Medical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode119999
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1199
dc.titleImpact of participant attrition on child injury outcome estimates: a longitudinal birth cohort study in Australia
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.description.versionPublished
gro.facultyGriffith Health, Menzies Health Institute
gro.rights.copyright© The Authors, 2017. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorOsborne, Jodie
gro.griffith.authorCameron, Cate M.
gro.griffith.authorSpinks, Anneliese B.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record