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dc.contributor.authorJurado-Rivera, Jose A
dc.contributor.authorPons, Joan
dc.contributor.authorAlvarez, Fernando
dc.contributor.authorBotello, Alejandro
dc.contributor.authorHumphreys, William F
dc.contributor.authorPage, Timothy J
dc.contributor.authorIliffe, Thomas M
dc.contributor.authorWillassen, Endre
dc.contributor.authorMeland, Kenneth
dc.contributor.authorJuan, Carlos
dc.contributor.authorJaume, Damia
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-30T12:30:50Z
dc.date.available2017-10-30T12:30:50Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-017-03107-y
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/347224
dc.description.abstractCave shrimps from the genera Typhlatya, Stygiocaris and Typhlopatsa (Atyidae) are restricted to specialised coastal subterranean habitats or nearby freshwaters and have a highly disconnected distribution (Eastern Pacific, Caribbean, Atlantic, Mediterranean, Madagascar, Australia). The combination of a wide distribution and a limited dispersal potential suggests a large-scale process has generated this geographic pattern. Tectonic plates that fragment ancestral ranges (vicariance) has often been assumed to cause this process, with the biota as passive passengers on continental blocks. The ancestors of these cave shrimps are believed to have inhabited the ancient Tethys Sea, with three particular geological events hypothesised to have led to their isolation and divergence; (1) the opening of the Atlantic Ocean, (2) the breakup of Gondwana, and (3) the closure of the Tethys Seaway. We test the relative contribution of vicariance and dispersal in the evolutionary history of this group using mitochondrial genomes to reconstruct phylogenetic and biogeographic scenarios with fossil-based calibrations. Given that the Australia/Madagascar shrimp divergence postdates the Gondwanan breakup, our results suggest both vicariance (the Atlantic opening) and dispersal. The Tethys closure appears not to have been influential, however we hypothesise that changing marine currents had an important early influence on their biogeography.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom2852-1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto2852-11
dc.relation.ispartofjournalScientific Reports
dc.relation.ispartofvolume7
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMarine and Estuarine Ecology (incl. Marine Ichthyology)
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode060205
dc.titlePhylogenetic evidence that both ancient vicariance and dispersal have contributed to the biogeographic patterns of anchialine cave shrimps
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2017. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
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gro.griffith.authorPage, Tim J.


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