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dc.contributor.authorRogers, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.authorSearle, Judithen_US
dc.contributor.authorCreed, Peteren_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:29:23Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:29:23Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2010-12-08T08:52:44Z
dc.identifier.issn10385282en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1440-1584.2010.01151.xen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/34844
dc.description.abstractObjective: Identify the most important factors associated with choosing rural medical practice. Design: Cross-sectional design using a web survey to collect quantitative and qualitative data. Participants: One hundred and ninety junior doctors - 91 interns, 99 PGY2. Main outcome measures: Choice of practice location (urban/rural), reason for choosing location, enticement to a rural location. Results: Twenty-seven per cent of junior doctors preferred a rural practice location. Preference to practice in a rural area was associated with medical placement bonding schemes, rural background, rural placement experience and being older. High levels of professional expectations and prestige were associated with a preference for an urban location. The most important reasons for choosing a practice location included consideration of partner, family and friends (35.3%), preference for a location (20.5%), lifestyle goals (19.5%) and career opportunities, specialty requirements and infrastructure (17.9%). Those who preferred an urban compared with a rural location gave more importance to factors concerning partner, family and friends. The factors that would entice a doctor to a rural location included partner and family considerations (27.0%), professional support (20.3%), and career opportunities, specialty requirements and infrastructure (16.3%). Women gave more importance to partner and family factors than men. Conclusions: Our findings support the continuation of policies that are known to encourage choice of rural practice, but highlight the need for additional strategies that consider the personal and professional needs of this generation of doctors.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom181en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto186en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Journal of Rural Healthen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume18en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170199en_US
dc.titleWhy do junior doctors not want to work in a rural location, and what would induce them to do so?en_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, Dept of Employment Relations and Human Resourcesen_US
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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