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dc.contributor.authorDavies, Saraen_US
dc.contributor.editorCaroline Soper, Chatham Houseen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T13:02:40Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T13:02:40Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2010-11-02T07:03:41Z
dc.identifier.issn00205850en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1468-2346.2010.00934.xen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/34851
dc.description.abstractThis article presents two approaches that have dominated International Relations in their approach to the international politics of health. The statist approach, which is primarily security-focused, seeks to link health initiatives to a foreign or defence policy remit. The globalist approach, in contrast, seeks to advance health not because of its intrinsic security value but because it advances the well-being and rights of individuals. This article charts the evolution of these approaches and demonstrates why both have the potential to shape our understanding of the evolving global health agenda. It examines how the statist and globalist perspectives have helped shape contemporary initiatives in global health governance and suggests that there is evidence of an emerging convergence between the two perspectives. This convergence is particularly clear in the articulation of a number of UN initiatives in this area-especially the One World, One Health Strategic Framework and the Oslo Ministerial Declaration (2007) which inspired the first UN General Assembly resolution on global health and foreign policy in 2009 and the UN Secretary-General's note 'Global health and foreign policy: strategic opportunities and challenges'. What remains to be seen is whether this convergence will deliver on securing states' interest long enough to promote the interests of the individuals who require global efforts to deliver local health improvements.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltden_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1167en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1190en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue5en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Affairsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume86en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchInternational Relationsen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160607en_US
dc.titleWhat contribution can International Relations make to the evolving global health agenda?en_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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