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dc.contributor.authorGarvis, Susieen_US
dc.contributor.authorPendergast, Donnaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T12:40:45Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T12:40:45Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2011-01-21T07:41:45Z
dc.identifier.issn18331866en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/34905
dc.description.abstractArts education is considered a compulsory part of the school curriculum in Queensland, Australia. Many generalist teachers throughout the state are responsible for its delivery to students. Yet the teaching that occurs in generalist classrooms appears to be dictated by policy reform. In 2007, the Australian government began a National Assessment Program for Literacy and Numeracy for years 3, 5, 7 and 9. In Queensland, teaching for literacy and numeracy was further influenced in schools by the commissioned Masters report (2009). Further testing for literacy, numeracy and science would be carried out in years 4, 6 and 8 within Queensland. The influence of these policy initiatives on the teaching of arts education in schools is unclear. While arts shares equal footing as a key learning area, its actual importance in schools may be substantially lower. This paper helps to provide a current snapshot of the influence of this government reform. In 2008, 201 beginning teachers responded to a questionnaire investigating their personal beliefs and values of teaching arts education compared to maths and English. This study reports on parts of those findings. Results suggest beginning teachers were persuaded to teach English and maths by their schools to improve test results. Subsequently, some beginning teachers suggested they changed their teaching styles of arts integration to more traditional models. Findings hold key messages for the future of arts education and integration in schools. If schools and governments value arts education, they need to provide greater support for the teaching of arts education alongside literacy and numeracy.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent331521 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherCommon Ground Publishingen_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://ija.cgpublisher.com/product/pub.85/prod.612en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom111en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto120en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Arts in Societyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume5en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCreative Arts, Media and Communication Curriculum and Pedagogyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode130201en_US
dc.titleDoes arts education have a future in Australia against literacy and numeracy?en_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Education and Professional Studiesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the authors 2010. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this journal please refer to the journal's website or contact the authors.en_AU
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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