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dc.contributor.authorKuhlmann, Torsten
dc.contributor.authorHutchings, Kate
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:48:41Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:48:41Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.date.modified2011-05-11T07:23:21Z
dc.identifier.issn13620436
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/13620431011020871
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/34919
dc.description.abstractPurpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore the specific difficulties that senior managers face when employing expatriate, Chinese and local-hired foreign managers in China-based subsidiaries of Western multinational companies (MNCs). Furthermore, it aims to examine the resultant coping strategies to overcome identified weaknesses. Design/methodology/approach - This research adopts a qualitative approach, using semi-structured interviews with key-informants from senior management in 44 Australian and German companies operating in China. Findings - The study identified specific difficulties associated with the employment of expatriate, local Chinese, and local-hired foreign managers in Australian and German subsidiaries in China. The interviewees indicate a widespread intention to replace expatriate managers with Chinese managers and local-hired foreign managers. The striving for localization of staffing is more pronounced in German than Australian MNCs. German companies offer more comprehensive development activities for the Chinese talent than Australian companies. Research limitations/implications - The small number of participants and the restriction to one key informant per company limit the generalizability of the findings. The effects of different staffing options still need to be researched in longitudinal studies and in varied contexts. Practical implications - Localization of staff suggests the need for specific, culture-sensitive approaches to personnel development. The findings also suggest that the knowledge transfer between expatriate and local managers deserves more attention. Finally, the return on investment that companies receive from differing staffing options should be assessed using a multidimensional set of success criteria. Originality/value - This paper has two main contributions to existing research. First, it links academic discussion about the options of international staffing with the experience of practitioners from Western MNCs operating in China. Second, it provides further support for the existence of country-of-origin effects in international staffing.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent148373 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherEmerald
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom20
dc.relation.ispartofpageto38
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalCareer Development International
dc.relation.ispartofvolume15
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHuman Resources Management
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBusiness and Management
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode150305
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1503
dc.titleExpatriate assignments vs localization of management in China: Staffing choices of Australian and German companies
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.rights.copyright© 2010 Emerald. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorHutchings, Kate


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