Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorTucker, Murrayen_US
dc.contributor.authorKavanagh, Justinen_US
dc.contributor.authorMorrison, Stevenen_US
dc.contributor.authorBarrett, Roden_US
dc.contributor.editorRichard G. Carson, Robert L. Sainburg, Dagmar Sternaden_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T11:23:51Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T11:23:51Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2011-09-12T06:48:45Z
dc.identifier.issn1940-1027en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00222895.2010.503252en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/34944
dc.description.abstractThe authors examined differences between young adults (n = 25) and healthy older adults (n = 48) in reaction time and the relations between center of pressure (COP) and center of mass (COM) motions during rapid initiation and termination of voluntary postural sway. Older adults were divided into low and high falls-risk groups based on Physiological Profile Assessment scores of sensorimotor function. Low falls-risk older adults had slower reaction times during anteroposterior sway initiation and decreased COP-COM separation during anteroposterior and medialateral sway initiation and anteroposterior continuous voluntary sway compared with young adults. High falls-risk older adults had slower initiation and termination reaction times in all response directions and decreased COP-COM separation during sway initiation and continuous voluntary sway in the anteroposterior and medialateral directions compared with young adults. Compared with low falls-risk older adults, high falls-risk older adults had slower initiation and termination reaction times in all response directions and decreased COP-COM separation during medialateral continuous voluntary sway. Reaction time and COP-COM measures significantly predicted group status in discriminant models with sensitivities and specificities of 72-100%. Overall, these findings highlight important associations of age-related declines in sensorimotor function related to an increased risk of falling with slower postural reaction time and reduced postural stability.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent370125 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationYen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom277en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto287en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue5en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Motor Behavioren_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume42en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMotor Controlen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiomechanicsen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110603en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110601en_US
dc.titleDifferences in rapid initiation and termination of voluntary postural sway associated with ageing and falls-risken_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2010 Routledge. This is an electronic version of an article published in Journal of Motor Behavior, Volume 42, Issue 5 September 2010 , pages 277 - 287. Journal of Motor Behavior is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com with the open URL of your article.en_AU
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record