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dc.contributor.authorAlcorn, KL
dc.contributor.authorO'Donovan, A
dc.contributor.authorPatrick, JC
dc.contributor.authorCreedy, D
dc.contributor.authorDevilly, GJ
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:05:53Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:05:53Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.date.modified2011-02-02T06:56:10Z
dc.identifier.issn0033-2917
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0033291709992224
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/35000
dc.description.abstractBackground Childbirth has been linked to postpartum impairment. However, controversy exists regarding the onset and prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after childbirth, with seminal studies being limited by methodological issues. This longitudinal prospective study examined the prevalence of PTSD following childbirth in a large sample while controlling for pre-existing PTSD and affective symptomatology. Method Pregnant women in their third trimester were recruited over a 12-month period and interviewed to identify PTSD and anxiety and depressive symptoms during the last trimester of pregnancy, 4-6 weeks postpartum, 12 weeks postpartum and 24 weeks postpartum. Results Of the 1067 women approached, 933 were recruited into the study. In total, 866 (93%) were retained to 4-6 weeks, 826 (89%) were retained to 12 weeks and 776 (83%) were retained to 24 weeks. Results indicated that, uncontrolled, 3.6% of women met PTSD criteria at 4-6 weeks postpartum, 6.3% at 12 weeks postpartum and 5.8% at 24 weeks postpartum. When controlling for PTSD and partial PTSD due to previous traumatic events as well as clinically significant anxiety and depression during pregnancy, PTSD rates were less at 1.2% at 4-6 weeks, 3.1% at 12 weeks and 3.1% at 24 weeks postpartum. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate the occurrence of full criteria PTSD resulting from childbirth after controlling for pre-existing PTSD and partial PTSD and clinically significant depression and anxiety in pregnancy. The findings indicate that PTSD can result from a traumatic birth experience, though this is not the normative response.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent100214 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherCambridge University Press
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationY
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1849
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1859
dc.relation.ispartofissue11
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPsychological Medicine
dc.relation.ispartofvolume40
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNeurosciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3209
dc.titleA prospective longitudinal study of the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder resulting from childbirth events
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Applied Psychology
gro.rights.copyright© 2010 Cambridge University Press. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorDevilly, Grant J.
gro.griffith.authorCreedy, Debra K.
gro.griffith.authorO'Donovan, Analise


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