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dc.contributor.authorSargeant, E
dc.contributor.authorAntrobus, E
dc.contributor.authorPlatz, D
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-03T01:44:07Z
dc.date.available2017-11-03T01:44:07Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn1573-3750
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11292-017-9296-0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/350068
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Academics and practitioners alike are concerned about the potential “double-edged sword” of procedural justice. In the organizational context, procedural justice is expected to increase compliance with supervisors. However, blind, unthinking, or “hard” compliance with supervisors, may lead to anti-organizational behavior and misconduct. The present study examines the moderating effect of a police recruit cultural training program on the relationship between procedural justice and compliance with police supervisors. We expect that providing cultural training will moderate the relationship between procedural justice and “hard” compliance. Methods: Participants were police recruits at the Queensland Police Academy who were randomly assigned to an experimental (Voice 4 Values) or control condition (business-as-usual training) upon entry into the academy. Recruits in both groups were surveyed pre- and post- training to capture perceptions of procedural justice and compliance with supervisors. Results: Results suggest that procedural justice mattered less for predicting “hard” or unthinking compliance among the recruits who received the Voice 4 Values cultural training package, compared to those who did not receive the training. Conclusions: We conclude that while procedural justice may be of interest to policing organizations, it is important that it is not used as a tool to encourage unthinking compliance. We find cultural training reduces the effect of procedural justice on unthinking or “hard” compliance.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSpringer Link
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom347
dc.relation.ispartofpageto365
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Experimental Criminology
dc.relation.ispartofvolume13
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolice Administration, Procedures and Practice
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160205
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1602
dc.titlePromoting a culture of fairness: police training, procedural justice, and compliance
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Criminology and Criminal Justice
gro.rights.copyright© 2017 Springer Netherlands. This is an electronic version of an article published in Journal of Experimental Criminology, Volume 13, Issue 3, pp 347–365, 2017. Journal of Experimental Criminology is available online at: http://link.springer.com/ with the open URL of your article.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorSargeant, Elise B.


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