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dc.contributor.authorTownsley, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorSidebottom, Aidenen_US
dc.contributor.editorProf Denise Gottfredsonen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T09:58:46Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T09:58:46Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2011-06-07T06:55:46Z
dc.identifier.issn17459125en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1745-9125.2010.00205.xen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/35081
dc.description.abstractThe results of this study reveal a major methodological problem with an established body of criminological literature-the journey to crime. The dominant finding of such research is that most crimes occur close to an offender's home. Consequently, journeys to crime typically display a distance-decay function that is assumed to exist between and within offenders. However, most journey-to-crime studies use nested data-individual offenders contributing multiple crime trips-yet employ analytic methods that fail to account for this property, leading to inference and aggregation concerns. In the study outlined in this article, we demonstrated the implications of using nested data for analyzing the journey to crime. We showed that once controlling for nesting, only a few (prolific) offenders display a distance decay pattern. Implications of the findings for theory and future research are discussed.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Criminology - Wileyen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom897en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto917en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalCriminologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume48en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolice Administration, Procedures and Practiceen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160205en_US
dc.titleAll Offenders Are Equal, But Some Are More Equal Than Others: Variation In Journeys To Crime Between Offendersen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Criminology and Criminal Justiceen_US
gro.rights.copyrightSelf-archiving of the author-manuscript version is not yet supported by the American Society of Criminology. Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version or contact the author for more information.en_AU
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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