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dc.contributor.authorSharman, Jasonen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T12:53:17Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T12:53:17Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2011-08-11T06:05:03Z
dc.identifier.issn09692290en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09692290802686940en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/35152
dc.description.abstractOffshore finance provides an incubator and testing ground for propositions concerning fundamental debates in international political economy. The common feature among offshore financial products is calculated ambiguity: the ability to give diametrically opposed but legally valid answers to the same question from different quarters. Thus offshore allows individuals and firms to enjoy simultaneous ownership and non-ownership, to be high profit and loss-making, heavily indebted but also debt-free, and for investment to be foreign and domestic. The advantages conferred to individuals and firms, however, tend to undermine the stability of the financial system. Using indirect governance techniques, transnational networks of regulators have sought to coercively simplify offshore finance, with mixed results. Focusing on ambiguity as central to offshore finance complements earlier theoretical treatments of this realm from law, anthropology and international relations. Empirically, the recently enhanced surveillance of offshore centers has produced new data facilitating future quantitative studies,which complement more anthropological approaches to this subject.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent93643 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto19en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalReview of International Poliitical Economyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume17en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchInternational Relationsen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160607en_US
dc.titleOffshore and the new international political economyen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, School of Government and International Relationsen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2010 Taylor & Francis. Published by Routledge. This is an electronic version of an article published in the Journal of Contemporary Asia, Volume 17, Issue 1 February 2010 , pages 1 - 19. The Journal of Contemporary Asia is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com with the open URL of your article.en_AU
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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