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dc.contributor.authorKebbell, Mark Rhys
dc.contributor.authorWestera, Nina
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-09T23:15:26Z
dc.date.available2017-11-09T23:15:26Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn1321-8719
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13218719.2017.1315786
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/351548
dc.description.abstractPolice detectives come into contact with a community's most dangerous violent offenders, but there is little empirical research concerning detectives’ beliefs about their characteristics. Twenty experienced detectives compared the characteristics and attributes of two offenders they believed to be the most dangerous repeat violent offenders in their community with two violent offenders who they believed to be less dangerous. Eighty offenders were identified in total. Thirteen bipolar dangerous–less dangerous constructs that differentiate the most dangerous violent offenders from other violent offenders were identified. The most frequently identified themes, mentioned by three quarters or more of the detectives, are being a heavy drug user (particularly amphetamines), being impulsive, and not thinking of the consequences of one's actions. The next three themes, mentioned by half of the detectives are extensive and regular offending, breadth of offending, and wishing to portray oneself as a ‘tough guy’. One theme detectives did not mention frequently is mental illness as being associated with the most violent offenders, suggesting that detectives may miss mental illness in their interactions with offenders. Detectives suggested responding to the most dangerous violent offenders with longer sentences, extensive monitoring and better intelligence.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto10
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPsychiatry, Psychology and Law
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminological Theories
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLaw
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160204
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1702
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1801
dc.titleThe 'Worst of the Worst': Detectives' Beliefs about Dangerous Violent Offenders and How to Deal with Them
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Applied Psychology
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.
gro.rights.copyright© 2017 Taylor & Francis (Routledge). This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Psychiatry, Psychology and Law on 22 Jun 2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/13218719.2017.1315786
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorKebbell, Mark R.
gro.griffith.authorWestera, Nina


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