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dc.contributor.convenorProf. Erica Smithen_AU
dc.contributor.authorBillett, Stephenen_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Greeren_US
dc.contributor.authorDymock, Darrylen_US
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Gregen_US
dc.contributor.editorProf. Erica Smithen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:11:12Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:11:12Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2011-07-04T06:47:25Z
dc.identifier.refuriavetra.org.auen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/35156
dc.description.abstractThis conference paper examines the perceptions of a group of employees aged 45 or more about their experiences of age discrimination in the work place. Retaining older workers is one way in which a productive work force can be maintained. However, a review of the literature reveals consistently negative attitudes by employers towards older workers, who are viewed as resistant to change, less productive, difficult to train and less motivated. This paper draws upon a survey of, and interviews with, Australian mature age workers. The topics covered included work life issues; work and work-related learning; intentions for their remaining working life; and the extent of age-related discrimination in their work places. The authors conclude from the survey data that; (1) mature age workers do not feel they are regarded as less capable than younger workers; (2) younger workers are the first to be offered training opportunities but this was not really a problem for the older workers; (3) while some older workers were concerned about technology, most did not subscribe to negative stereotypes of older workers; and (4) over three quarters of survey participants felt supported by their employers and did not believe there was ageism in their workplace.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent101334 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherAVETRAen_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.voced.edu.au/td/tnc_100.285en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameAVETRA 2010en_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleVET Research: Leading and responding in turbulent timesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2010-04-08en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2010-04-09en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationSurfers Paradise, Australiaen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode139999en_US
dc.titleOlder workers and work: societal and personal sentimentsen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Education and Professional Studiesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2010 AVETRA. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Use hypertext link for access to the publisher's website.en_AU
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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  • Conference outputs
    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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