Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWeeks, Benjaminen_US
dc.contributor.authorBeck, Belindaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T11:10:38Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T11:10:38Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2010-12-07T07:32:34Z
dc.identifier.issn20420064en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.4061/2010/546593en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/35267
dc.description.abstractThis study examines the relationships between bone mass, physical activity, and maturational status in healthy adolescent boys and girls. Methods. Ninety-nine early high-school (Year 9) students were recruited. Physical activity and other lifestyle habits were recorded via questionnaire. Anthropometrics, muscle power, calcaneal broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA), bone mineral content (BMC), and lean tissue mass were measured. Maturity was determined by Tanner stage and estimated age of peak height velocity (APHV). Results. Boys had greater APHV, weight, height, muscle power, and dietary calcium than girls (P < .05). Boys exhibited greater femoral neck BMC and trochanteric BMC while girls had higher BUA and spine BMAD (P < .05). Physical activity and vertical jump predicted BMADand BUAmost strongly for boys whereas years from APHV were the strongest predictor for girls. Conclusion. Sex-specific relationships exist between physical activity, maturity and bone mass during adolescence.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent266783 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSage - Hindawi Access to Researchen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto9en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Osteoporosisen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume2010en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchExercise Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHuman Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110602en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110699en_US
dc.titleThe relationship between physical activity and bone during adolescence differs according to sex and biological maturityen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Allied Health Sciencesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the authors 2010]. The attached file is posted here with permission of the copyright owners for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted.For information about this journal please refer to the journal's website. The online version of this work is licensed under a Creative Commons License, available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.1/au/en_AU
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record