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dc.contributor.authorDaly, Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorBouhours, Brigitteen_US
dc.contributor.editorMichael Tonryen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:23:18Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:23:18Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2011-01-18T05:43:08Z
dc.identifier.issn01923234en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/35271
dc.description.abstractDespite legal reforms, there has been little improvement in police, prosecutor, and court handling of rape and sexual assault. In the past 15 years in Australia, Canada, England and Wales, Scotland, and the United States, victimization surveys show that 14 percent of sexual violence victims report the offense to the police. Of these, 30 percent proceed to prosecution, 20 percent are adjudicated in court, 12.5 percent are convicted of any sexual offense, and 6.5 percent are convicted of the original offense charged. In the past 35 years, average conviction rates have declined from 18 percent to 12.5 percent, although they have not fallen in all countries. Significant country differences are evident in how cases are handled and where in the legal process attrition is most likely. There is some good news: a victim's "good" character and credibility and stranger relations are less important than they once were in police or court outcomes. However, evidence of nonconsent (witness evidence, physical injuries to the victim, suspect's use of a weapon) continues to be important.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent614005 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherUniversity of Chicago Pressen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/abs/10.1086/653101en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom565en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto650en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalCrime and Justiceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume39en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminology not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160299en_US
dc.titleRape and attrition in the legal process: a comparative analysis of five countriesen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Criminology and Criminal Justiceen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2010 by University of Chicago Press. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. First published in Crime and Justice. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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